Beyond Boundaries: Geneseo’s NeuWrite/Edu Program Bridges Fields Often Forced Separate

Posted by Madison Wayland, CNF Reader for issue 6.1

So, uh, what are you going to do with that?”

This is the response I often receive from—well-meaning, and for the most part understandably confused—internship coworkers, peers in a new class, old friNeuWriteends I run into at Wal-Mart, as I answer that standard what-are-you-doing-with-your-life question every college student receives at Christmas dinners. I tell them I’m a double major, biology and creative writing, and watch their faces slowly twist as they try to comprehend the combination. Continue reading

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Reading as a Writer vs. Reading as an Editor: How are They Different?

Posted by Emma Corwin, Fiction Reader for issue 6.1

About a week into reading submissions for the upcoming issue of Gandy Dancer, I noticed how different, and sometimes challenging, it is to think with the mind of an editor. Having taken multiple writing workshops since starting college, I anticipated that reading for Gandy Dancer would be similar. Although there are certainly similarities between the two, there are also a few things about editing that I hadn’t considered. Continue reading

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The Importance of Artists of Color

Posted by Jennifer Liriano, Fiction Reader for issue 6.1
The newest edition of Gandy Dancer will be featuring incredible art. As it turns out, much of the art is by a group of culturally diverse students. It is important to have this sort of representation in a literary journal because if readers from similar backgrounds see their culture represented, it may speak to them personally and perhaps even encourage them to pursue more creative outlets. Continue reading

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“We Write Poems to make the Invisible, Visible.” -Martin Espada, the Mission of the poet

Posted by Meghan Fellows, Managing Editor for issue 6.1
On the way to the 2017 FUSE (Forum for Undergraduate Student Editors) www.fuse-national.com conference this past weekend, myself, and the other passengers in my car were antsy. The conference was based in Pennsylvania, and we had a lot of road left. We were all excited; we would be representing Geneseo in a space where student writers and editors from all over the country were coming together for a weekend of workshops, and literary bonding. The theme for the conference was Resistance, and the keynote speaker was Martin Espada. From the backseat, the DJ of the hour was switching songs, and talking about the Espada. Continue reading

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Fifth Annual Pub Fair at the Visual Studies Workshop

Posted by Rachel Britton, Poetry Editor for issue 6.1

Poetry printed into sidewalk bricks of the Memorial Gallery’s Poetry Walk led me to the Pub Fair, a day of books, art, beer, and coffee at the Visual Studies Workshop (VSW). Promoting its most recent issue, Gandy Dancer had a significant presence with representatives from the managing, nonfiction, and art editors, staff readers, and friends of the journal. The event offered creative vendors space to sell and build their network likeminded individuals. Among those in attendance were BOA Editions, Ltd., Writers and Books, Open Letter translations from the University of Rochester, and RIT’s art magazine Draft. I was overwhelmed by the amount of art, magazines, journals, and organizations present. And by extension, the size of Rochester’s art community! Continue reading

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Five Books To Help Relieve Heartbreak

Posted by Julia Merante, Poetry Reader for issue 6.1

We’ve all been there. Whether you are suffering after a divorce, first love lost, or the defeat of your favorite team, heartbreak is tough. Here are five books to read that will help you cope in this trying and difficult time. Continue reading

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What’s Your Story About?

Posted by Timothy Blomquist, CNF Reader for issue 6.1

It’s the first question someone asks when you tell them you’re writing a story. Your answer may vary—maybe it’s a story about a happy time in your life, or a place from your childhood that you remember fondly. Or maybe it’s about something darker—a relative who passed, or a friend, or some other person or thing taken from you too soon. Maybe you’re writing about something in between happiness and despair, something seemingly random that’s been nagging at you for some time, for reasons you can’t really explain. Therein lies the real question: What are you really writing about? Continue reading

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National Novel Writing Month: November is NaNoWriMo

Posted by Nicole Gartley, Poetry Reader for issue 6.1

Fall is in the air, and November is upon us, bringing with it NANOWRIMO, also known as National Novel Writing Month. The name alone is daunting: one month, to write a whole novel? The basic premise as listed on the website is even more daunting: starting November first, participants aim to write a 50,000 word novel. The first time I heard of NANOWRIMO, all I could think was that is a lot of words, and not nearly enough time to write them in. Since then, I have managed to complete the challenge not once, but twice. While neither work is necessarily publishable, there is a certain pride to knowing that you can write that much, you can make the time, and, in my case in particular, you can muscle your way through your writer’s block. Continue reading

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7 Spooky Stories to Keep You in the Halloween Mood

Posted by Liz Verrastro, Fiction Section Head for issue 6.1

Halloween has just passed and it seems that with that, all the spooky energy has as well. Whether you dressed up as Wonder Woman, a clown, or someone from Game of Thrones for Halloween, nothing keeps the fun alive more than scary tales. If the success of the new film adaptation of Stephen King’s It is anything to go by, people love to be scared, so why not let the fun continue after Halloween has passed? Why else would there be a multi-million-dollar haunted house industry? Here are seven scary fiction pieces, perfect to keep the Halloween spirit alive even after the holiday has passed. Continue reading

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Literary Journals in the High School Curriculum

Posted by Katie Rivito, Poetry Reader for issue 6.1

Although I cannot recall its name, the first literary journal I was introduced to left a lasting impression on me. This was not because I found its contents intriguing or its purpose inspiring, but because I was forced to study it page by page with excruciatingly focused attention while my friends tailgated our high-school football game.

My dad had come home that day just moments before dinner time, calling out to my sister and me to quickly meet him at the dining room table. We walked into the room to find him sitting at the head of the table with two copies of a book in front of him.

“You won’t believe what I showed my students today,” he announced excitedly as he slid us each a book from across the table. Continue reading

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